keithwj:

“The Girl in the Blue Bra” 

There have been countless accounts of violence recorded during the uprisings in Egypt but the image that perhaps has captured the most attention is the most recent. The image has been widely referred to as the “girl in the blue bra.”
A veiled young woman is dragged and beaten by Egyptian military during a protest in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Her face is covered. Her torso is bare, except for her bright-blue bra, which is a millisecond away from being kicked by a solider. - NPR Picture Show (photo-Reuters/Landov)

keithwj:

“The Girl in the Blue Bra” 

There have been countless accounts of violence recorded during the uprisings in Egypt but the image that perhaps has captured the most attention is the most recent. The image has been widely referred to as the “girl in the blue bra.”

A veiled young woman is dragged and beaten by Egyptian military during a protest in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Her face is covered. Her torso is bare, except for her bright-blue bra, which is a millisecond away from being kicked by a solider. - NPR Picture Show (photo-Reuters/Landov)

(via picturesoftheday)

picturesoftheday:

Riot police officers blocked more than 1,000 protesters—including  small-business owners and veterans of the Soviet war in Afghanistan—as  the demonstrators rallied against austerity measures in front of  Ukrainian Parliament in Kiev

picturesoftheday:

Riot police officers blocked more than 1,000 protesters—including small-business owners and veterans of the Soviet war in Afghanistan—as the demonstrators rallied against austerity measures in front of Ukrainian Parliament in Kiev

Video that clearly shows police using flashbang grenades on protesters who gathered to assist wounded Iraq war veteran Scott Olsen. At present, he remains in critical condition, with a fractured skull and a swollen brain.

picturesoftheday:

Thousands of Korea Exchange Bank employees protested Thursday in Seoul  over the sale of a controlling stake in their bank to Hana Financial  Group. U.S. private-equity group Lone Star Funds agreed to sell its  51.02% stake in the bank to Hana.

picturesoftheday:

Thousands of Korea Exchange Bank employees protested Thursday in Seoul over the sale of a controlling stake in their bank to Hana Financial Group. U.S. private-equity group Lone Star Funds agreed to sell its 51.02% stake in the bank to Hana.

Via Gawker:

The Seattle Police Department has begun handing out tickets to motorists—includingcab drivers—who honk if they love their localOccupy Wall Street contingent. People can probably still honk if they love Jesus, though don’t quote us on that.

Apparently lots of Seattleites were honking insupport of the protesters, currently camped out at Westlake Park (in case you want to visit them after church today). One ticketed honker is cab driver Ayad Agila, who told KOMO News he was “shocked” that he had to pay either $124 or $144 just for making his car go beep-beep. Agila told KIRO he won’t pay the fine, and now he’s probably on some sort of government watch list. Meantime, protesters have been trying to help their supporters by holding signs warning them not to honk.

Car horns are annoying. It’s a well-known fact. Seriously! But how can the cops tell if drivers are honking for the protesters, or honking for purely driving-related reasons? Also, shouldn’t they ticket people who let their car alarms go off, because that’s even worse than incessant honking? I’m only suggesting these ideas in order to make a more fair and equitable society in Seattle, and also to help the SPD maximize its earning potential.

It’s another Battle of Seattle!

[KOMOImage via AP]

From Glenn Greenwald….

The Occupy Wall Street protest has been growing in numbers, respectability, and media attention for several weeks now.  Despite that, The New York Times‘ financial columnist who specializes in Wall Street coverage, Andrew Ross Sorkin, has neither visited the protests nor written about them — until today.  Ina column invoking the now-familiar journalistic tone of a zoologist examining a bizarre new species of animal discovered in the wild, Sorkin explains what prompted him to finally pay attention (via Michael Whitney):

I had gone down to Zuccotti Park to see the activist movement firsthandafter getting a call from the chief executive of a major bank last week, before nearly 700 people were arrested over the weekend during a demonstration on the Brooklyn Bridge.

“Is this Occupy Wall Street thing a big deal?” the C.E.O. asked me. I didn’t have an answer. “We’re trying to figure out how much we should be worried about all of this,” he continued, clearly concerned. “Is this going to turn into a personal safety problem?

How interesting that when a CEO “of a major bank” wants to know how threatening these protests are, he doesn’t seek out corporate advisers or dispatch the bank’s investigators, but instead gets the NYT‘s notoriously banker-friendly Wall Street reporter on the phone and assigns him to report back.  How equally interesting that if this NYT financial columnist can’t address the concerns and questions of a CEO “of a major bank,” he hops to it to find out what was demanded of him.  Sorkin did what he was told…

Read the rest here.

Also who does the branding on this? “Free Speech Zones”? I can think of nothing more Orwellian. 

ninety9:

The first protest I sorta participated in (in NY) was the AIDS rally in ‘92, during the Democratic convention. Peter probably remembers (noted only because some perspective about his point on Obama/Clinton divergence and corporate pandering) - it was the first large ‘legitimate’…

(Source: usernameninetynine)

neiture:

Right now, hundreds of people are peacefully occupying wallstreet in order to take the power back to the people. 

neiture:

Right now, hundreds of people are peacefully occupying wallstreet in order to take the power back to the people. 

(Source: rorschachx)